Blog

CLASSIC LIST

bigstock-Doctor-In-Medical-Gloves-Exami-107467631-1200x800.jpg
26/Sep/2017

The summer is here, and so too are the bare legs. Though if you suffer from varicose veins, you might be inclined to stick to wearing trousers instead of reaching for the shorts. Unless you have the varicose veins treated in time for the summer. And if you did decide to get this vascular condition treated, you certainly wouldn’t be alone.

According to a report titled ‘Varicose Vein Treatment Market in North America and Europe by Treatment Mode (Endovenous Ablation, Sclerotherapy, Stripping), Product (Laser & RF Ablation, Venous Closure, Surgical) – Forecasts to 2021’, the varicose vein treatment market in Europe and North America will be worth a staggering $289.7 million by 2021.

One innovative method that is being hailed has a new effective treatment for varicose veins, is the less so innovatively named ‘medical super glue’.

This new treatment, VenaSeal, was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2015. According to reports, the super glue can seal the veins shut from the inside-out. It uses a medical adhesive which is inserted into the affected vein through a catheter, which then seals the vein shut.

Dr. Joseph Magnant, a vascular surgeon and vein specialist, who is currently the only surgeon offering the treatment in Southwest Florida, explains how VenaSeal works,

“What that adhesive does is it bonds or reacts with the blood and forms a solid core, basically sealing the vein, but without using heat.”

A comprehensive study into the effectiveness of VenaSeal showed that the new treatment is an effective as an earlier, similar type of treatment for varicose veins known as ClosureFast. ClosureFast worked by sealing the vein from the inside but used a heated catheter to seal the vein shut.

Though according to Dr. Magnant, the primary difference between the two treatments is that VenaSeal is potentially a less painful type of treatment due to the fact this method only requires a single point of entry. As the vein specialist explains:

“With the thermal, you need to put water around the vein to protect the patient from the catheter. The catheter heats up to 250 degrees Fahrenheit, and unless you have a column of liquid around the patient’s leg, they’re going to feel like they’re burning.”

“With VenaSeal, there’s no heat; there’s no need for the extra six sticks, or the pressure from the fluid, or the potential for feeling some heat,” Dr. Magnant continued.

The VenaSeal treatment currently costs between $4,000 and $4,500.

If you are in the UK and suffer from varicose veins and would like to discuss the condition and different treatment possibilities, get in touch with Daryll Baker at The Vascular Consultancy in London. Daryll Baker is one of the UK’s leading specialists in varicose veins, providing advice, diagnosis, and treatment options, so patients can make an informed decision on which is the best treatment for varicose veins for them.


bigstock-127637120-1200x1200.jpg
26/Sep/2017

There are hundreds of thousands of people in the UK living with the excessive sweating condition known as hyperhidrosis. Whilst it doesn’t pose a serious threat to somebody’s health, hyperhidrosis can be distressing and embarrassing, and have a negative impact on one’s emotional wellbeing.

Historically, treatments to this condition have been fairly limited. Changing lifestyle habits, such as avoiding sweating ‘triggers’ like eating spicy food and drinking alcohol, is one so-called treatment.

Being prescribed a stronger antiperspirant that contains aluminium chloride is another method of treating hyperhidrosis. As is anticholinergics, types of medicine that work by eliminating the effects of the acetylcholine chemical, which is used by the nervous system to activate sweat glands.

However, treatments for hyperhidrosis are increasing, including a ‘next generation’ of antiperspirants which contains aluminium zirconium trichlorohydrex.

According to Dr. David Pariser, professor of dermatology at eastern Virginia Medical School, these ‘next gen’ antiperspirants are more effective and less irritating than other products previously on the market.

Speaking at the recent Caribbean Dermatology Symposium, Dr. Pariser spoke of other new topical products to treat hyperhidrosis in the pipeline, including glycopyrrolate gels and wipes and topical botulinum toxins.

However, despite the rise in treatments, many experts are calling on dermatologists, cosmetic surgeons and others to pay more attention to this condition and offer patients more ‘permanent’ options in terms of treatment.

Carolyn Jacob, M.D., director of the Chicago Cosmetic Surgery and Dermatology Centre is one expert urging for more to be done to help those suffering from hyperhidrosis.

In a recent presentation at the Annual Conference of the American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery in Boston, Dr. Jacob spoke of the embarrassment many patients feel about sweating excessively and how clinically significant sweating can impair the “quality of daily activities and work.”

Dr. Jacob presented an update on hyperhidrosis treatments, informing that a number of technologies are being researched for the treatment of hyperhidrosis, including microwave, ultrasound, laser and radiofrequency.

Speaking of the benefits of microwave technology, including hair and odour reduction, Dr Jacob said:

“Microwave technology shows an 89% typical reduction of sweat after two treatments, spaced two months apart. This technology has the most clinical patients studied to date.”

Dr. Pariser reiterates the benefits effective permanent treatments for the condition could have on hyperhidrosis sufferers. The doctor spoke of how effectively treating focal hyperhidrosis, whereby profuse or excessive sweating is confined to certain areas of the body, can lead to “greater improvement of a patient’s quality of life than treatment of any other dermatological disorder.”

Hyperhidrosis treatments are, according to Dr. Pariser, “easy to learn, economically viable, and easily incorporated into a routine office practice.”

If you have any queries or concerns about hyperhidrosis and other vascular conditions, get in touch with Daryll baker, a Consultant Vascular Surgeon. Daryll Baker runs a vascular practice in both the NHS and privately, helping patients with vascular conditions from across Europe and the Middle East.


bigstock-Hands-of-medical-doctor-man-wi-110995748-1200x641.jpg
26/Sep/2017

Earlier this year, the 2016 Global Laser Treatment Devices of Varicose Veins Industry Report was published, an in-depth and professional analysis on the market conditions of the Laser Treatment Devices of the Varicose Veins industry. The report is the most comprehensive and strategically analysed research in the market, providing this most granular data.

The 2016 Global Laser Treatment Devices of Varicose Veins Industry Report focuses on the North American, European and Asian regions, and primarily on the United States, Germany, China and Japan. The report introduces the definitions, classifications, applications and industry policies and plans of Laser Treatment Devices of Varicose Veins. It goes on to analyse the conditions of varicose vein laser treatment mapped out by the world’s main markets in the treatment of varicose veins.

This comprehensive report, which can be bought here, comprises of six parts, including basic information, the Asia Laser Treatment Devices of Varicose Veins industry, the North American Laser Treatment Devices of Varicose Veins industry, the European Laser Treatment Devices of Varicose Vein industry, market entry and investment feasibility and the report conclusion.

The fact that such comprehensive research is being devoted to the varicose vein treatment market is testament at just how imperative it is to find effective and less invasive ways to treat this condition.

It is noted that as many as 1 in 3 adults suffer from varicose veins and with the population getting older, this figure is set to get higher.

Varicose vein treatment market poised for growth

The varicose vein treatment market in general is forecast is witness growth between 2016 and 2021. As Yahoo writes, there will be a “Shift towards less invasive treatment procedures, availability of advanced varicose vein treatment devices, huge burden of varicose vein cases in North America and Europe, improving patient compliance and reliability, growing healthcare expenditure, and rapid growth in aging population will majorly drive the varicose vein treatment market.”

Due to a rising adoption of advanced treatment procedures for varicose veins and proactive government initiatives, it has been suggested that Europe is expected to register the highest growth rate in the varicose treatment market from between 2016 and 2021.

If you are suffering from varicose veins and would like to discuss the condition and different treatment possibilities, get in touch with Daryll Baker at The Vascular Consultancy in London. Daryll Baker is one of the UK’s leading specialists in varicose veins, providing advice, diagnosis, and treatment options, so patients can make an informed decision on which is the best treatment for varicose veins for them.


bigstock-Close-Up-Of-Hospital-Nurse-Hol-114155276-1200x800.jpg
26/Sep/2017

Hyperhidrosis sufferers might be one step closer to having an easy-to-use treatment for what can often be an embarrassing condition. Thanks to Dermira Inc., the problem of excessive sweating might be able to be treated more easily via its experimental topical therapy.

Dermira is a biopharmaceutical company that is aimed at developing and commercialising innovative topical therapies to improve the lives of patients.

The company recently released the results of from its trials into its topical, anticholinergic product, which is in development to treat primary axillary hyperhidrosis.

According to a statement made by Dermira, the product statistically demonstrated making significant improvements for both the “co-primary endpoints and secondary endpoints sweat severity and production – in the ATMOS-2 trial for the treatment of primary axillary hyperhidrosis compared with a vehicle.”

Thomas Wiggans, MBA, chairman and CEO of Dermira shared his enthusiasm of the results.

“These results from the ATMOS-1 and ATMOS-2 trials bring us a step close to offering DRM04 as a once-daily, topical treatment for the millions of people who suffer from primary axillary hyperhidrosis, an undertreated skin condition.”

There were however a couple of side effects recorded by those who underwent the topical treatment, including application site pain and a dry mouth.

Therapies currently available for hyperhidrosis are generally regarded as fairly ineffective and can tend to be expensive. When antiperspirants are used and fail to provide any real results, many sufferers of this excessive sweating condition turn to more aggressive alternatives, such as having Botox injections. Sufferers can also undergo laser therapy, which destroys the sweat glands.

Another treatment hyperhidrosis patients have the option of using is a device known as MiraDry. MiraDry essentially provides electromagnetic energy, which decomposes the sweat glands. Sweating can also be systematically limited through oral medicines. Localised surgery, such as liposuction, can also be used on hyperhidrosis sufferers, which can injure or remove the sweat glands.

Based on the results of the trials, Dermira has announced it is going to submit the application to the Food and Drug Administration with the aim of getting it submitted by the second half of 2017.

Hyperhidrosis affects approximately 1% of the population. The condition is caused by an overactive nervous system, which, working at an extremely high level, causes excessive sweating to occur. As HyperhidrosisUK.org notes, this condition is not temporary, and many who suffer from it have done so for years.

If you have any queries or concerns about hyperhidrosis and other vascular conditions, get in touch with Daryll baker, a Consultant Vascular Surgeon. Daryll Baker runs a vascular practice in both the NHS and privately, helping patients with vascular conditions from across Europe and the Middle East.


vas_logo

Daryll Baker is a Consultant Vascular Surgeon at the Royal Free Hospital London and Clinical Lead for North Central Region Vascular Services.

He read Medicine at Oxford University and trained in Vascular Surgery in Nottingham, London and Edinburgh. He obtained his research PhD from the University of Wales.

Contact

Wellington Hospital
34 Circus Road
London
NW8 9SG

020 7722 7370

Copyright 2016 The Vascular Consultancy